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The Marketplace Drives Prices Down and Quality Up

By George LandrithTownhall

Unexpected expenses are never welcome and no one likes a costly surprise. So it’s no wonder that there is a lot of talk in Washington and Congress about “protecting” patients from surprise medical bills. Current legislation — SB 1895 — sponsored by Senators Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn) and Patty Murray (D-Wash.) makes such claims. It sounds good until you realize that all the “protecting” talk is just that — talk.  Even worse, is that rather than protecting consumers, it will make things worse. 

The most common cause of a surprise medical bill is when a person uses a healthcare provider that is not in their insurance plan’s network of providers. While it doesn’t happen that often, it most typically happens in a hospital emergency room — either because the patient is not able to consent to care or because the patient received inaccurate information about insurance coverage.  

Insurance companies have contracts with healthcare providers (both doctors and hospitals) to provide medical services at pre-negotiated discounted rates. That makes them “in-network.” The “out-of-network” providers charge a price without any pre-negotiated discounted rates, meaning the out of network costs are greater. 

While it is true that most doctors are in most insurance networks and hospitals often have ways to shield their patients from higher costs, there are occasional gaps that remain. And while it is uncommon, it can be costly when it occurs. But despite their rarity, these circumstances are used by politicians to make us think they are proactively solving problems for our benefit. Sadly, they are doing nothing of the sort.  

There are a number of proposals currently under consideration in the halls of Congress to fix surprise billing, but they have a couple important things in common. In one-way or another, all of these pieces of legislation entrust the government with the power to set prices. This will impose heavy costs even if executed properly, an idea that is almost laughable given the government’s track record on reducing costs.

This reminds me of the Obama-Biden repeated promise that they had a plan that would save us all thousands of dollars every year and allow us to keep our healthcare plan if that’s what we wanted. Obviously, Obama and Biden failed to deliver on that promise. It was the lie of the year even as judged by liberal fact checkers. Literally, millions of Americans lost their preferred plans and virtually everyone saw their health insurance costs increase, not decrease, by thousands. 

So a healthy dose of skepticism about promises to fix surprise billing with government price controls is entirely justified. It should not be enough for politicians to repeat over and over the mantra that they’ve got the fix. We’ve seen this play before. It doesn’t end well.  

Government-imposed price controls skew incentives and reduce the availability of quality healthcare.  To make things worse, government-imposed price controls also reduce the likelihood of future healthcare innovations and slow the development of promising medicines and procedures. But the bad news doesn’t end there — current proposals shift more and more power to health insurance companies, rather than giving consumers more control over their own healthcare. 

Regardless of what their true motives were or are, the results we have witnessed in the last 50 years from politicians promising “fixes” has been that things end up costing a lot more than promised, and government gets more and more control. Those who can afford lobbying efforts may escape the costly impact of these government mandates. But rarely do these promised fixes on balance help the average citizen.   

The marketplace — and the negotiations that take place when you have two or more parties all trying to maximize the value that they receive — has a knack for providing high quality goods and services for the lowest possible prices. That is the process that has brought us smart phones that have more computing power than was used in the 1960s in the Apollo program. It’s also the process that allows consumers to own huge flat screen televisions at a cost of several hundred dollars. We need to harness that power and that drive to high quality and low prices in the medical arena.

Instead of continuing to empower government and those who can afford lobbyists to protect their interests, let’s try reforms that put economic power back in the hands of healthcare consumers. Let’s trust the marketplace to do what it does so well — boost quality and keep prices comparatively low. We trust the marketplace to provide us with food, housing, technology, and a thousand other things, why not our healthcare as well? 

Today, the average American eats better and spends a lot less to feed themselves than our great grandparents did. As a result, we have access to all manner of foods — something even kings didn’t have a few generations ago. Additionally, we work far fewer hours to obtain that food. As a result, we have more money for larger, more comfortable homes, nice automobiles, vacations, and hospitals — something average Americans in 1776 didn’t even dream about.   

So if we want to see more affordable and better quality healthcare available to us all — why not harness the power of the marketplace? Where’s the proof that government-run schemes produce the needed quality and low costs? In contrast, the marketplace has a strong track record. Let’s try it! 


More than ever before, corporate governance matters

By Peter RoffHavasu News

The coronavirus crisis has likely changed American business forever, as politicians use the deadly pandemic to push for changes that will have a major impact on how corporations operate.

How business respond will determine the future of American commerce for years. Important business leaders like Black Rock’s Larry Fink are pushing companies to expand their mission beyond maximizing value for shareholders into things that are on progressives’ political wish list.

What Fink and others are advocating for drifts harmfully towards what progressives promote as they seek to control the business sector and move to a centrally planned economy.

If the American economy is to survive, let alone thrive, we need corporate leaders to step up in defense of the free market. They need to eschew the insider deals and crony capitalism that have caused many Americans, especially the young, to lose faith in what, as Churchill might have quipped, is the worst of all possible economic systems except for all the others.

There are heroes out there like Tesla’s Elon Musk, who recently stood up to Gov. Gavin Newsome and other officials who would not permit his California manufacturing plant to reopen and get people back to work. To Musk’s credit, even though his empire is built on questionable tax breaks, credits, and subsidies, he pushed back where other business leaders have sheepishly complied. He announced he’d be taking his company and the jobs he created to Texas or Nevada, where they would be welcomed. Faced with that, Newsome and company seem to have backed down.

For every hero, there are goats like Alan Armstrong, the CEO of Williams Co., an energy pipeline company. According to recent allegations made in a Delaware court, he secretly worked to undermine a 2016 board-approved merger between his firm and Energy Transfer, a Texas-based pipeline company, that would have paid shareholders a significant premium over the then-market value of their shares.

Nearly four years since it fell through, Williams continues to seek more than a billion dollars in breakup fees, despite Armstrong’s recently alleged involvement in the deal’s demise. According to court documents, he even worked behind the scenes with a former Williams senior vice president by using a personal account and leaking inside information to assist a lawsuit filed to block the proposed and ultimately unconsummated merger. As a result, half of his board of directors resigned days after the deal was called off, citing a lack of confidence in his ability to lead the company.

The reason he acted as he did, the court was told, was out of a desire to maintain his position as CEO even if his continued leadership of the company was detrimental to shareholder interests.

Actions like these in the corporate community have regular Americans – more and more of whom join the investor class every day through their 401Ks, Roth IRAs, and by trading stocks online – wondering if their money is safe, or if they’re just feeding corporate cats growing fat off their investments.

Warren Buffet, one of the country’s most respected financial leaders, argued in a recent interview that not enough attention is paid to corporate leadership and governance. “Almost all of the directors I have met over the years have been decent, likable and intelligent,” he said. “Nevertheless, many of these good souls are people whom I would never have chosen to handle money or business matters. It simply was not their game.”

If the CEOs and boards of America’s companies don’t step up to restore public confidence in who they are and what they do, then the politicians will – as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi tried to do in the first coronavirus relief bill. Other than the privileged few that would have been picked to serve on boards if her proposed amendment requiring diversity on corporate boards had been adopted, it would have been bad for business and everyone else.

The clock is running.


On Health Care, Most People Don’t Know What They’re Talking About

By Ben Southwood • National Review

Health care in the United States is famous for three things: It’s expensive, it’s not universal, and it has poor outcomes. The U.S. spends around $7,000 per person on health care every year, or roughly 18 percent of GDP; the next highest spender is Switzerland, which spends about $4,500. Before Obamacare, approximately 15 percent of the U.S. population were persistently uninsured (8.6 percent still are). And as this chart neatly shows, their overall outcome on the most important variable — overall life expectancy — is fairly poor.

But some of this criticism is wrongheaded and simplistic: when you slice the data up more reasonably, U.S. outcomes look impressive, but being the world’s outlier is much more expensive than following behind. What’s more, most of the solutions people offer just don’t get to the heart of the issue: If you give people freedom they’ll spend a lot on health care. Continue reading


Ronald Reagan Lecture Series presents George Landrith of the Freedom Foundation


Michael Bloomberg’s Soda Ban Won’t Solve the Obesity Problem

The government should incentivize healthy choices rather than prohibit unhealthy ones.

by Peter Roff     •     US News

big governmentAmerica has tried the experiment with prohibition before. It didn’t work.

That lesson seems to be lost on New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who is spending an inordinate amount of time trying to protect people from things that are supposedly not good for them. First it was cigarettes. Then it was trans-fat. Now it’s large sodas. Where will it end?

Actually, that’s an important question. We live in a country where Congress and the president can collude to produce a law forcing everyone to purchase health insurance or pay fines and penalties. Does that mean, as more than one person has asked, they can likewise enact laws intended to force people to eat broccoli? Continue reading


The Case Against Higher Taxes

 

While the 2000s may have been a lost decade for the American dream, a revival of our model’s advantages is still a real, worth-desiring possibility.

Reagan-tax-cuts2by Ross Douthat

Because it was tax day recently, because he mentions me and because I’m easily provoked, below the quote you’ll find three rejoinders to Jonathan Cohn’s admirably forthright argument that American society would be much better off if most of us were writing larger considerably larger checks to Uncle Sam:

Maybe you don’t like tax day … [because] it reminds you of how high taxes are—and you think that, because of those high taxes, the economy grows more slowly. That would mean fewer jobs and less pay for you—and the country as a whole. It’s not a crazy argument … But the evidence for this point of view turns out to be thinner than you’ve probably heard. Relative to other countries, tax rates in the U.S. are relatively low, even when you throw in local and state taxes and add them to federal levies. Overall, according to the Tax Policy Center and Center on Budget and Policy Priorities … taxes in the U.S. are among the lowest in the developed world. The average for countries in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, an organization of rich countries, is higher. And in countries like Sweden, Norway, and the Netherlands countries, the average is much higher. In those nations, taxes account for more than half of total national income. Continue reading


A Republican Plan for Healthcare Reform

bobby jindalPresident Obama has repeated claimed that the Republicans have only voted to repeal ObamaCare, but have no ideas or proposals of their own. This was, and is, entirely false – just like when Obama said, “If you like your health plan, you can keep your health plan.”  You may ask why does he so consistently say demonstrably false things? Because the media won’t hold him accountable.  He does it because he can. Here’s just one of the many Republican plans for healthcare reform. 

by Philip Klein

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal came to Washington on Wednesday with a message to those arguing that conservatives would have to operate within the policy framework created by President Obama’s health care law: “I absolutely do not think we can give up the fight to repeal Obamacare.”

The potential 2016 Republican presidential candidate was in town to promote a new health care plan developed by his America Next policy group that would not only repeal Obamacare in its entirety, but also make sweeping changes to the system that existed prior to the law’s implementation.

Under Jindal’s proposal, Obamacare would be replaced with a system that equalizes the tax treatment of health insurance. Instead of merely giving tax advantages to those who obtain insurance through their employers, the Jindal plan would create a standard deduction for health insurance for all taxpayers. Continue reading


The Minimum Wage and Economic Reality

Obama Minimum Wageby Steve Chapman

If you offer people something that is too good to be true, you will always find takers. Ask Bernie Madoff. Or ask Barack Obama. He recently proposed an increase in the minimum wage — an idea that suits the natural predilections of many people enough to distract them from the unsentimental and unwelcome logic of economics.

One poll found that 63 percent of Americans favor raising the federal floor from the current $7.25 to $10.10, as the president recommends doing over two years. The reasons are obvious. Wages have stagnated, low-income Americans are getting a smaller share of national income and many working people are stuck in poverty despite their best efforts. A higher minimum wage is the obvious solution.

Obvious, but wrong. The proposal rests on the assumption that the government can decree the price of a commodity — in this case, labor — in defiance of the dictates of the market, without ill effects. But that view requires a heroic suspension of disbelief. Continue reading


Big Government: Strangling Life

big governmentby John Stossel

There are now 175,000 pages’ worth of federal laws. Local governments add more.

I’m not so cynical that I think politicians pass laws just to control us. Someone always thinks: “This law is needed. This will protect people.”

But the cumulative effect of so many rules is to strangle life.

Yet lawyers like George Washington Law professor John Banzhaf want more rules. Continue reading


Tribute to Margaret Thatcher (October 13, 1925 – April 8, 2013)

Margaret Thatcher was a friend to the United States and the principles of liberty. She rescued the U.K. from economic malaise with economic policies that empowered the individual and harnessed the power of the marketplace. She joined with Ronald Reagan to win the Cold War using the “peace through strength” doctrine. She empowered her people, strengthened her nation, and made the world a safer, better place. She will be missed.


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