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Tag Archives: Regulatory Reform


When Picking Apples on a Farm With 5,000 Rules, Watch Out for the Ladders

By Steve Eder • New York Times

ALTAMONT, N.Y. — For eight weeks every fall, Indian Ladder Farms, a fifth generation
family operation near Albany, kicks into peak season.

The farm sells homemade apple pies, fresh cider and warm doughnuts. Schoolchildren arrive by the busload to learn about growing apples. And as customers pick fruit from trees, workers fill bins with apples, destined for the farm’s shop and grocery stores.

This fall, amid the rush of commerce — the apple harvest season accounts for about half of Indian Ladder’s annual revenue — federal investigators showed up. They wanted to check the farm’s compliance with migrant labor rules and the Fair Labor Standards Act, which sets pay and other requirements for workers.

Suddenly, the small office staff turned its focus away from making money to
placating a government regulator.

The investigators arrived on a Friday in late September and interviewed the
farm’s management and a group of laborers from Jamaica, who have special work
visas. The investigators hand delivered a notice and said they would be back the
following week, when they asked to have 22 types of records available. The
request included vehicle registrations, insurance documents and time sheets —
reams of paper in all.

Continue reading


The Nanny State does not know better

By Peter Roff      •     Washington Examiner

The bureaucratic impulse to regulate nearly everything that moves has brought what former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher used to call the Nanny State home to our shores. (AP Photo)

As a general rule, Americans do not like to be told what to do. They will tolerate it, especially when the government makes threats or issues some rule that make sense in the infinite scheme of things, but they’re not happy about it most of the time. This country was founded as a sort of experiment in entrepreneurship — in the commercial sense as well as in the political arena.

Over time, however, the entrepreneurs have given way to the paper-pushers. The bureaucratic impulse to regulate nearly everything that moves has brought what former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher used to call the Nanny State home to our shores.

As a result, the ordinary American businessman who was once a virtual king of all he or she surveyed has been forced to turn to the courts to seek relief from the stranglehold that regulatory agencies, legislative bodies and the do-gooders among us have on American small business. Continue reading


To save lives, reform the FDA

FDA Drugs Medicine Reformby Peter Roff

America has the best health care system in the world. The same freedoms we all enjoy that produce innovations and advancement in technology, in manufacturing, in finance, in science also combine to lift what the nation’s medical community has to offer well above what is available in the rest of the world.

Recently, the deciphering of the human genome has sparked a serious of advancement in mankind’s understand of the way the human body works which, in turn, is creating new and exciting breakthroughs in the treatment of illness.

Many, like the Manhattan Institute’s Peter Huber, believe America is poised on the edge of a new era of personalized medicine arising from the ability to understand diseases and the drugs that made be used to treat them at the molecular level.

The single biggest impediment to these advances may be the very same agency that is charged with protecting the American people from patent medicine rip-offs and home-based cures that are based more on folk wisdom than science.

The facts, as ABC News recently informed people when it reported “New Drug Approvals for FDA Declined in 2013,” are clear. In the name of keeping us healthy, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration may be condemning people to death.

How can that be? Call it, for want of a better term, a lack of humanity and meaningful cost benefit analysis in the drug approval process. Continue reading


Tax reform and reduction and easing regulations key to boosting economy

redtape-RegulationAs auto sales plateau, the industry and the U.S. economy need more freedom to grow.

While October numbers show auto sales continuing on their path to pre-recession levels of 15.5 million annually, the good news should not be read as an indicator of the overall strength of the economy. The country can’t rely on one industry to aid its lackluster recovery. Rather, tax reform and deregulation must be priorities for long-term growth.

A new Michigan economic study finds that the implementation of the Affordable Care Act will be a drag on the economy next year. Small businesses have resisted hiring under the uncertainty of Obamacare’s costs, and consumers are feeling the shock of higher health care premiums and canceled policies entering the holiday buying season. That’s not what the economy needs.

In the fourth year of sluggish growth, the twin federal policies of increased regulation and stimulus spending have brought diminishing returns. Continue reading


The Healthy Fisheries through Better Science Act

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The Hon. Rob Wittman
2454 Rayburn HOB
United States House of Representatives
Washington. D.C. 20515

Dear Representative Wittman:

On behalf of the members and supporters of Frontiers of Freedom, let me say that we welcome the introduction of your legislation H.R. 3063, the Healthy Fisheries through Better Science Act.

Your leadership in this vital area will help in the effort to extend property rights as a tool for species conservation and sound environmental management over the now-discredited command and control approach still practiced by many parts of the United States government.

If enacted, your legislation will produce improvements in stock assessments through the increased involvement of fishermen and non-federal partners.  Fisheries science will be enhanced and the costs of compliance and monitoring will be reduced.  Continue reading