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Tag Archives: environmentalism


Governed By Zealots

by John Stossel     •     RealClearPolitics

The government’s environmental rules defeat even environmentalists.

Thomas Collier is a Democrat who managed environmental policy for Bill Clinton and Al Gore. Then he noticed a mining opportunity in Alaska, one he calls “the single largest deposit of gold and silver that is not being developed in the entire world.”

Tom’s company hired hundreds of people to study the Pebble Mine’s potential environmental impact, a first step before asking the Environmental Protection Agency for permission to dig. Usually, the EPA analyzes a company’s study, then does its own research, then rules. But in this case, the EPA did something odd — it rejected the mine before Pebble even got its application in.

That’s never happened before, says Collier. Continue reading


Failure Is a Growth Industry at the ICC

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By Shawn Macomber • Lawfare Tyranny

Steven Freeland, a professor of international law at the University of Western Sydney, has studied the current track record of the International Criminal Court — i.e. thirteen years, a billion dollars, two convictions of obscure African warlords, pure impotence everywhere else — and decided it is time to add a new task to the aspiring transnational behemoth’s plate.

Specifically, he would like to see the ICC’s founding document, the Rome Statue, amended to allow the Court to prosecute “rampant and excessive environmental damage during armed conflict.”

Here’s what Freeland had to say about the enterprise to Lawyers Weekly:

Those who engage in warfare have to recognize that, of course, we must always take every necessary action to minimize damage and suffering to human beings, but that in no way means that the environment is open slather.

I suppose if this all works out environmentalists can get behind womenKurds, and many others in the long line of victims waiting for the ICC to fail them.


Foreign Firm Funding U.S. Green Groups Tied to State-Owned Russian Oil Company

Executives at a Bermudan firm funneling money to U.S. environmentalists run investment funds with Russian

by Lachlan Markay     •     Washington Free Beacon

oil-well-drillingA shadowy Bermudan company that has funneled tens of millions of dollars to anti-fracking environmentalist groups in the United States is run by executives with deep ties to Russian oil interests and offshore money laundering schemes involving members of President Vladimir Putin’s inner circle.

One of those executives, Nicholas Hoskins, is a director at a hedge fund management firm that has invested heavily in Russian oil and gas. He is also senior counsel at the Bermudan law firm Wakefield Quin and the vice president of a London-based investment firm whose president until recently chaired the board of the state-owned Russian oil company Rosneft.

In addition to those roles, Hoskins is a director at a company called Klein Ltd. No one knows where that firm’s money comes from. Its only publicly documented activities have been transfers of $23 million to U.S. environmentalist groups that push policies that would hamstring surging American oil and gas production, which has hurt Russia’s energy-reliant economy. Continue reading


The World’s Resources Aren’t Running Out

Ecologists worry that the world’s resources come in fixed amounts that will run out, but we have broken through such limits again and again.

oil-well-drillingby Matt Ridley

How many times have you heard that we humans are “using up” the world’s resources, “running out” of oil, “reaching the limits” of the atmosphere’s capacity to cope with pollution or “approaching the carrying capacity” of the land’s ability to support a greater population? The assumption behind all such statements is that there is a fixed amount of stuff—metals, oil, clean air, land—and that we risk exhausting it through our consumption.

“We are using 50% more resources than the Earth can sustainably produce, and unless we change course, that number will grow fast—by 2030, even two planets will not be enough,” says Jim Leape, director general of the World Wide Fund for Nature International (formerly the World Wildlife Fund).

But here’s a peculiar feature of human history: We burst through such limits again and again. After all, as a Saudi oil minister once said, the Stone Age didn’t end for lack of stone. Ecologists call this “niche construction”—that people (and indeed some other animals) can create new opportunities for themselves by making their habitats more productive in some way. Agriculture is the classic example of niche construction: We stopped relying on nature’s bounty and substituted an artificial and much larger bounty. Continue reading


18 Spectacularly Wrong Apocalyptic Predictions Made Around the Time of the First Earth Day in 1970

global warning-catastrophic predictions-apocalyptic by Mark J. Perry

On the 30th anniversary of the first Earth Day in 1970, Ronald Bailey wrote an excellent article in the May 2000 edition of Reason Magazine titled “Earth Day, Then and Now.” In that article, Bailey noted that around the time of the first Earth Day, and in the years following, there was a “torrent of apocalyptic predictions” and many of those predictions were featured in his Reason article. Well, now that more than 40 years have passed, how accurate were those predictions around the time of the first Earth Day? Wrong, spectacularly wrong, and here are 18 examples:

1. Harvard biologist George Wald estimated that “civilization will end within 15 or 30 years unless immediate action is taken against problems facing mankind.” Continue reading


The Great Schism in the Environmental Movement

“Green traditionalists . . . publish high-profile papers warning ‘that population growth, widespread destruction of natural ecosystems, and climate change may be driving Earth’ to an irreversible tipping point. . . . The common thread: . . . Humans are planet wreckers. Time is running out for us. The modernist greens, by contrast, don’t catastrophize. They are even optimistic about the future.”

by Keith Kloor

Prince William Sound blueIn 2005, two renegade greens tried to kill off environmentalism in broad daylight. The environmental movement, they said in a provocative essay, had grown stale and ineffectual. It was beholden to a wooly-headed, tree-hugging worldview that was as dated as lava lamps, bellbottoms and Billy Jack. This save-the-Earth brand of environmentalism, which has long idealized wilderness (as true nature) while simultaneously designating humanity as the scourge of the planet, “must die so that something new can live,” Ted Nordhaus and Michael Shellenberger wrote in “The Death of Environmentalism” (PDF).

Their critique landed like a thunderclap in green circles. Some environmentalists welcomed the jolt. But Sierra Club Executive President Carl Pope, channeling the reaction of many establishment green leaders, was dismissive: “I am deeply disappointed and angered by it,” he wrote in a long retort. Continue reading


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