×
↓ Freedom Centers

Tag Archives: Casino Gambling


Congress must decide Indian casino controversy

By Peter Roff     •     The Hill

When Congress passed the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act in 1988 it was with the intention that a framework for the green-lighting of Indian casinos on historically tribal lands could continue.

In a lot of places it has worked well. In others it has failed to live up to expectations. Some people are still getting rich but the overwhelming poverty the casino revenues were supposed to alleviate remains. Nor have they created a limitless stream of wealth. The economic downturn that began with the crash of 2008 affected the gaming industry just as much as the rest of the economy and you don’t have to be Donald Trump to know it’s a bigger “crap shoot” than most people believe.

Since the act went into effect it has generally been left up to the discretion of the U.S. Department of the Interior whether a specific tribe can go into the casino business and how many sites they may operate if they can. During the Bush administration, standards were reasonably rigorous and considerable heft was given to the sentiments of state and local officials. That’s one of the reasons Arizona voters were given the chance to vote on Prop. 202, which is essentially a master plan governing the spread of tribal casinos throughout the state that is scheduled to be in force until 2027. Continue reading


Monument To Hubris In The Arizona Desert

by George LandrithGaming Gambling

I don’t know if the ancient language of Arizona’s Tohono O’odham Native American tribe includes a word for “hubris” — defined as excessive pride or self-confidence, with synonyms like “arrogance” and “deceit.”

Regardless of whether they have an equivalent word for hubris, the Tohono O’odham Nation (TON) leaders have proven themselves masters of the concept.  And the casino they plan to open December 20th in the Phoenix suburb of Glendale is a monument to hubris, not to mention greed and a shameless distortion of the principle of tribal sovereignty. Now, it appears, federal legislation is the only solution.

All 17 Arizona gaming tribes – including TON – joined in a compact with the state, supported by a public referendum that gave the tribes exclusive rights to operate gambling casinos in Arizona. In return the tribes agreed to specific limits on the number of casinos in Arizona. This was intended to prevent over-saturation thereby providing financial support to the tribes and host communities through gaming revenues, a structure that has proven profitable since enacted in 2002.

The TON casino in Glendale violates the agreed upon limit of seven casinos in the Phoenix area at least until the compact expires in 2027. TON already runs three lucrative casinos on their reservation lands near Tucson. Its Glendale invasion is empire-building pure and simple, not to be confused with a poor tribe trying to pull itself out of poverty. Continue reading


Scott Walker’s Tough Decision on Indian Casinos and Unions

walker casino unionsby George Landrith

Summary: For years, a Wisconsin Indian tribe has tried to open a new casino hundreds of miles from its reservation. The controversy over the casino has encouraged the tribe to cut deals with labor bosses in which the unions trade their political support for the tribe’s agreement to help coerce casino workers into joining unions. Now Gov. Walker must decide whether to approve the proposed casino.

 

Indian casinos make fertile ground for controversy. They mix identity politics involving a long-oppressed group with heavy government regulation, which leads to wheeling and dealing, favoritism and corruption, and Indian casinos also add in the gambling industry, labor unions, and other elements often considered shady.

In Wisconsin, Republican Gov. Scott Walker must now choose whether to approve a new casino in Kenosha that would be owned by the Menominee tribe of Wisconsin and managed by Hard Rock International, a company owned by the Seminole Tribe of Florida. Continue reading


Coalition Letter to Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker

Coalition LetterheadGovernor Scott Walker
P.O. Box 7863
Madison, WI 53707-7863

Dear Governor Walker:

Families, businesses and communities in Wisconsin and around the nation are concerned with the dangerous track Indian gaming is taking in the Badger State.  The Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 and state law contemplated that that casinos built by Native American Tribes would be on reservation lands.

The requirements placed on tribal casinos are rigorous both those from the federal government and the State of Wisconsin — and for good reason.  We would like to express our thanks to you as you continue to uphold these long-standing regulations.  Continue reading