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Tag Archives: Lower Taxes


Thanks To Tax Cuts, Companies’ Overseas Profits Now Flooding Back To U.S.

By Investor’s Business Daily

They said it wouldn’t happen, but it did: The money companies stashed overseas to protect them from high U.S. corporate tax rates is flooding back in, boosting growth, jobs and confidence in the economy. Thank the Trump tax cuts.

All told, the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) reported, some $305.6 billion returned to the U.S. from overseas accounts. That’s a $1.2 trillion annual rate, and far more than the $35 billion one year before.

The BEA’s analysts explain why this happened: “The large magnitudes (of inward capital flows) … reflect the repatriation of accumulated earnings by foreign affiliates of U.S. multinational enterprises and their Continue reading


Conservative Tax Reform Has Brought Our American Economy Back to Life

By Grover Norquist and Alex Hendrie • The Hill

The tax cuts passed by Congress and signed into law by President Trump six months ago are already impacting our nation in these ways.

Americans are paying less in taxes

Ninety percent of wage earners around the country are already seeing increased take-home pay because of tax reform. Under the bill, a family of four with annual income of $73,000 will see a tax cut of more than $2,058, a 58 percent reduction in federal taxes. Similarly, a single parent with one child with annual income of $41,000 will see a tax cut of $1,304, a 73 percent reduction in federal taxes.

Workers are getting raises and bonuses

Immediately after passing of the GOP tax cuts bill, businesses responded by giving their employees pay raises and bonuses. AT&T announced it would provide each of its 200,000 U.S. employees with a $1,000 bonus. Altria is Continue reading


Federal Tax Revenues Hit Record Highs — Are Trump’s Tax Cuts Paying For Themselves?

Investor’s Business Daily

The latest monthly Treasury report on taxes and spending shows that gross tax receipts in February were $1.4 billion higher than the year before. Weren’t the Republican tax cuts supposed to explode the deficit?

According to the report, the government took in $238.2 billion in taxes in February. The year before, tax revenues were $236.8 billion.

For fiscal year 2018, which started last October, taxes are up $50.5 billion compared with the same months last year, and are at a record high level for this five-month span.

The report does show that net receipts were lower in February compared with last year, but the main reason is that individual income tax refunds jumped $13.3 billion, while corporate tax refunds went up $4 billion, neither of which is the result of the tax cuts that took effect in January.

Even so, net receipts are up by $29.6 billion for the current fiscal year — a 2.4% increase — compared with the same period last year. That’s also a record high. (See nearby chart.)

Does this mean tax cuts are “paying for themselves”?

Not exactly. Income taxes collected in February were down $2.5 billion from last year — reflecting the new withholding tables. Corporate income tax collections, however, were essentially flat.

But remember, income taxes are hardly the only source of revenue for the federal government. And a faster-growing economy means more money pouring in from these other sources.

Payroll taxes, for example, are dependent on the number of people working and their wages. In February, the economy added 313,000 jobs, unemployment levels are now at or near record lows, and wages are climbing.

As a result, payroll taxes brought in $1.5 billion more in February than they did last year, and are up $11.4 billion this fiscal year. Federal excise taxes and customs duties are up $3.8 billion and $1 billion, respectively, this fiscal year.

What these numbers do show is that all the hand-wringing about the impact of the tax cuts on federal deficits was based on wildly exaggerated estimates of revenue losses, which failed to take into account the fact that a faster growing economy would offset at least of the lost revenue. That’s a point we’ve made repeatedly in this space.

In contrast, tax hikes almost always bring in less revenue than expected, because they dampen economic growth.

Democrats once understood this truism. It was JFK, after all, who said in 1962 “it is a paradoxical truth that tax rates are too high today and tax revenues are too low — and the soundest way to raise revenues in the long run is to cut rates now.”

Today’s Democrats, in contrast, uniformly opposed the Trump tax plan, and are now pushing to repeal most of it so they can spend an additional $1 trillion on government make-work infrastructure projects.

Their plan has no chance of being enacted, but at least voters will have a clear choice this November.


Tax Cuts Work — Just Ask Small Businesses

Brian Ellis • Investor’s Business Daily

Employers have until Thursday to implement new tax withholding guidelines, which determine how much they withhold from pay for federal taxes.

Fortunately for many Americans, job creators are already seeing lower rates and distributing larger paychecks. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin estimates more than 90% of working Americans will see greater take-home pay because of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act’s new withholding guidelines.

It’s further proof that tax cuts are working for the middle class. To date, more than 330 U.S. employers have publicly announced tax-induced wage hikes, 401(k) increases, and generous bonuses. While Apple and Wal-Mart grab the headlines, many beneficiaries of the Republican tax bill are small businesses, which account for two-thirds of new jobs in the country.

Missouri-based Dynamic Fastener, a construction hardware supplier, is rewarding employees with bonuses of up to $1,000, while also opening a paint shop, buying new equipment and Continue reading


A Tax Cut Victory Before Labor Day

by Lawrence Kudlow, Stephen Moore, Arthur B Laffer, and Steve Forbes • Investor’s Business Daily

President Trump and Republican leaders in Congress must act with much more urgency and decisiveness on tax cuts.

In recent weeks the tax cut agenda seems stalled out and the delays and indecision are negatively affecting growth and the stock market. We hear that a tax plan from the White House may not come until the fall and may not even pass Congress until 2018 – if at all.

Is it any wonder that investors are getting jittery? The stock market had priced in much of the anticipated benefits to business, wages and profits, which accounts in no small part for the $3 trillion rise in equity values and the surge in business and consumer confidence after the election. Now the confidence is waning. Continue reading


America Needs Comprehensive Tax Reform To Get Moving Again

by Peter Roff • Washington Examiner

Though America has prospered since the end of the so-called “great recession,” the economy has grown by so little it’s hardly worthy of mention. The boom that began under Ronald Reagan ended with the collapse of the sub-prime mortgage industry. The country is no longer moving. Something must be done to get things going again.

The answer to our problems is simple. America needs tax reform to get moving again. There are a number of good, serious proposals out there from the Hall-Rabuska flat tax to the “Better Way” plan being pushed by House Speaker Paul Ryan. None of them is perfect but they’d all produce lower rates by eliminating deductions and credits. They’d all make the system simpler, and they’d all goose the economy to get annual growth in U.S. GDP where it should be, around three or four percent annually if not higher. Continue reading


What Real, Honest Tax Reform Will Look Like

How Congress, Trump rework the tax code without abandoning conservative principles

By George LandrithLifezette

Imagine going to your boss with your personal budget. The list would include things you want to spend money on, such as: your home, car, groceries, dining and entertainment projections, vacation plans, charitable giving goals, etc.

Now picture telling your boss he must fund your planned budget. You don’t bother to discuss your value to the company, but rather demand he fully fund your personal budget.

This is a difficult conversation to imagine because the real world doesn’t work that way. We don’t get paid based on what we want our personal budget to be, but rather the value we provide. Then based on what we receive, we budget accordingly. Yet, big government demands that it play by a different set of rules. Continue reading


The Answer to Corporate ‘Inversion’

Rather than trying to ban the practice, why can’t Obama address corporate tax reform?

by Charles Krauthammer    •    National Review

Tax Inversion GraphThe Obama administration is highly exercised about “inversion,” the practice by which an American corporation acquires a foreign company and moves its headquarters out of the U.S. to benefit from lower tax rates abroad.

Not fair, says Barack Obama. It’s taking advantage of an “unpatriotic tax loophole” that hardworking American families have to make up for by the sweat of their brow. His treasury secretary calls such behavior a violation of “economic patriotism.”

Nice touch. Democrats used to wax indignant about having one’s patriotism questioned. Now they throw around the charge with abandon, tossing it at corporations that refuse to do the economically patriotic thing of paying the highest corporate tax rate in the industrialized world.  Continue reading


The Tale of Two Recoveries


by Michael Hausam

How often have you heard a Democrat prattle on and on about how well Barack Obama has done with the economy, given the mess he inherited? Usually, it’s some version of, “Things are getting better, but the economy the President started with was so awful, so he’s done as well as anyone could expect.”

When Ronald Reagan took over from Jimmy Carter in ’81, things were actually worse economically compared to when Obama took over from George W. Bush in ’08. Continue reading


Statement of George Landrith on Senate Finance Committee’s Tax Increase Negotiations

tax-cut-7-16-10Statement of Frontiers of Freedom President, George Landrith, on Senate Finance Committee’s work on tax code “extenders”:

Our corporate tax rates are far too high. The rate kills investment and job creation and it makes us less competitive with other nations who have had the good sense to lower their tax rates. Germany has cut its rates almost in half in the last 25 years. Socialist Sweden has cut its by more than one half. And Ireland has cut its rates by almost 75%. We, on the other hand, have raised our corporate tax rates over that time period — leaving us with the highest rates in the industrialized world.

It is no coincidence that our unemployment rate is historically high and our labor participation rate is historically low. It is also no coincidence that our economic growth rate is painfully slow and far too low.

We realize that there will not be any meaningful tax reform or lowering of the tax rates this year.  But the idea that the Senate Finance Committee might consider extending some legitimate tax deductions for manufacturing that actually make profits and employ people, but killing others means that the Senate plans to raise taxes on some american corporations at a time when the economy is weak, employment numbers are bad and taxes are already too high. This is bad policy! Continue reading


Fixing California: Higher taxes don’t mean a better life

California-tax-and-regMove to low-tax state of Tennessee a real eye opener

by Arthur Laffer

In June of 2006, I deserted my long-time friend and love of my life, California, for the unknown venue of Tennessee. The push and the pull of the two locations are pretty obvious — taxes. Tennessee, like Texas, has no state income tax, no state capital gains tax, lower property taxes, lower workers’ compensation costs and roughly the same sales tax rate. California, on the other hand, is just simply tax- and fee-crazy.

But in spite of all the tax, fee and regulatory reasons for leaving California, I was deeply concerned that I would be stranded in an uneducated, lawless morass of tobacco-chewing Neanderthals driving old clunkers on dirt roads where churches were on every street corner and there wasn’t a hospital to be found. Continue reading


The Family, the Pursuit of Happiness, and Tax Reform

tax reform government spending moneyRemarks by Senator Mike Lee to the American Enterprise Institute on September 17, 2013:

I am here today because I believe the public policy status quo in Washington – and in particular, within the Republican Party – must once again be challenged and transformed. The focus of my remarks will be the new tax reform proposal I will soon be introducing in the Senate.

But before I get into the specifics of the legislation, I think it’s important to explain the problem it has been designed to solve.

On this Constitution Day, allow me to begin with thoughts from perhaps the two most important constitutionalists in American history. The first, from James Madison, is that the “object of government,” is “the happiness of the people.” The second, from Abraham Lincoln, is that the role of government is: “…to lift artificial weights from all shoulders, to clear the paths of laudable pursuit for all, to afford all an unfettered start and a fair chance in the race of life.” Continue reading


Tax day reminds Americans that federal spending and taxes are too high

George Landrith, president of Frontiers of Freedom, made the following statement on tax day, April 15th:  Taxes

Will Rogers once said, “It is a good thing that we do not get as much government as we pay for.”  That may be true, but I think we all wish we were paying for a lot less government and a lot less taxes. Our federal government is at historically high levels of spending — in recent years gobbling up nearly 25% of the total economic output.

Every year, the federal government spends more money than it did the last year. Even this year with the “sequester,” federal government will spend more money this year than it did the year before. Continue reading


Americans Are Migrating to States with Lower Taxes and Less Regulation

by John Merline   red state blue state

Americans are migrating from less-free liberal states to more-free conservative states, where they are doing better economically, according to a new study published Thursday by George Mason University’s Mercatus Center.

The “Freedom in the 50 States” study measured economic and personal freedom using a wide range of criteria, including tax rates, government spending and debt, regulatory burdens, and state laws covering land use, union organizing, gun control, education choice and more.

It found that the freest states tended to be conservative “red” states, while the least free were liberal “blue” states. Continue reading