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Tag Archives: totalitarianism


The Beginning of the End for the People’s Republic of China

by Dr. Miklos K. Radvanyi China Money Dollars

Contrary to the erroneous opinions of most politicians and Sinologists, the People’s Republic of China, well into the seventh decade of its existence, is facing severe political and economic crises.  Maoism, the gibberish amalgam of twisted socialist ideas and hard-core Han racism, had never been about Marxism-Leninism with “Chinese characteristics.”  Rather, Maoism was designed to be a double edged political sword.  On the one hand, Maoism meant autocratic contempt for the “politically incompetent” and “economically immature” subjects who could not be trusted with affairs of any importance.  On the other hand, Mao wanted to establish, maintain and protect his “thorough revolution” by excluding intellectuals with “bourgeois mentality”, whether inside or outside the party, and base his autocracy on inexperienced and uneducated workers, peasants and soldiers, self-evidently comprising of incompetent and immature individuals. Continue reading


It’s time to realize that Vladimir Putin can’t be trusted

Vladimir-Putin-006by James J. Carafano

Who killed Kennedy? The CIA.

Who introduced AIDS to Africa? The CIA.

Sure, it’s crazy talk. But those stories were two of Moscow’s most successful disinformation campaigns during the Cold War.

And now Vladimir Putin is reviving these dirty tricks.

That’s the argument made in Disinformation: Former Spy Chief Reveals Secret Strategies for Undermining Freedom, Attacking Religion, and Promoting Terrorism, co-authored by Ion Pacepa, an ex-intelligence officer who defected from Romania in 1978, and Ronald Rychlak, a professor at the University of Mississippi. And what’s happened during the Ukraine crisis surely supports their thesis. Continue reading


The Iran Enigma

by Dr. Miklos K. Radvanyi   ahmadinejad

History, in her disposition toward intellectually gifted peoples and nations, appears as fickle as the gods of ancient times were wont to be of their most devout revelers; the more those peoples and nations excelled the less they were shielded from endless tribulations, great catastrophes, and devastating tragedies. Like most of the nation-states of Europe and Asia, present-day Iran had a glorious history, yet unlike them, it has been torn since 1979 between revolutionary adventurism and reactionary self-preservation.

The fatal contradiction in Ayatollah Khomeini’s doctrine of the “guardianship of the jurist” (velayat-e faqih) is that, by definition, it contains the political seeds of its own destruction. Continue reading