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Tag Archives: Spending


Middle class left behind by Obamanomics

Empty-Pocketsby Timothy P. Carney

“Even though our businesses are creating new jobs and have broken record profits,” President Obama said in his economics address last week, “nearly all the income gains of the past 10 years have continued to flow to the top 1 percent.”

It’s odd that Obama touts these facts, because the facts indict his policies. This is even stranger: Many Republicans want to downplay these facts, even though they provide the GOP with an opening.

Obama’s first term, with all its tax hikes, regulations, mandates, subsidies and bailouts, saw stock markets rise, corporate earnings break records and the rich get richer, while median income stagnated and unemployment remained stubbornly high. Continue reading


Tax day reminds Americans that federal spending and taxes are too high

George Landrith, president of Frontiers of Freedom, made the following statement on tax day, April 15th:  Taxes

Will Rogers once said, “It is a good thing that we do not get as much government as we pay for.”  That may be true, but I think we all wish we were paying for a lot less government and a lot less taxes. Our federal government is at historically high levels of spending — in recent years gobbling up nearly 25% of the total economic output.

Every year, the federal government spends more money than it did the last year. Even this year with the “sequester,” federal government will spend more money this year than it did the year before. Continue reading


The Obamaian Universe

“In the Obamaian universe, the units of the private economy . . . are satellites orbiting the great fixed planet of public spending.”

Ptolemaic geocentric systemby Daniel Henninger

It may be that we have to move beyond politics alone to explain events in Washington. We are in the fifth year of the Obama presidency, and Washington is still dead in the water. Four straight years in which the government of the United States of America fails to enact a budget is, well, amazing.

The sense is growing around Washington, and this increasingly includes Democrats, of living in an alternative universe. Barack Obama gives his State of the Union speech, the sequester looms, and the president flies around the country giving speeches. He’s had virtually no contact on the sequester with the legislative branch. Continue reading


Not a spending problem, but a “paying-for” problem?

Worse, a veiled liberal threat to correct what they deem a “misallocation of wealth.”

by Scott L. Vanatter

Over the past week liberal House and Senate leaders have spoken openly about how they see America’s spending problem. They don’t see it. They claim that we don’t have a spending problem.

First, Rep. Pelosi (D-CA) relabeled it as a “priorities problem.” Then, Rep. Hoyer (D-MD) redefined it as a “paying-for problem.” Finally, Senator Harkin (D-IA) revealed the usually hidden liberal designs on capital. He turned the equation upside down by describing problem of a lack of funds to pay for what we have spent, not because we do not have a budget, but because we have “misallocation of wealth problem.” Continue reading


Ronald Reagan on Tax Cutting Legislation (The “whole controversy”)

“This whole controversy: Are you entitled to the fruits of your own labor or does government have some presumptive right to spend and spend and spend?” 

by Scott L. Vanatter

Ronald Reagan is well known for his multi-decade devotion America’s purpose and promise. By returning to these lofty ideas America would fulfill its destiny.

His July 27, 1981 speech was President Reagan’s main public effort to educate the nation on the benefits of a bipartisan bill to cut taxes and spending. He taught America, once again, how and why cutting taxes and spending (cutting the rate of growth of government spending) would make for a stronger economy — and help restore America’s latent greatness.

It was Reagan’s habit to speak on large themes. In this particular case he used a two-letter word to illustrate one of the largest of political themes. He stated that the people in electing him wanted to make a change from ‘by’ to ‘of.’ Succinctly put, “It doesn’t sound like much, but it sure can make a difference changing by government,’ ‘control by government’ to ‘control of government.’” Continue reading


National Debt of $16 Trillion: Is it a bad time?

Why isn’t there a debt clock in the convention hall in Charlotte, NC?

$16 TRILLION is an astronomical number. If you were to count from 1 to 1 million without stopping (assuming about 1 second per number on average), it would take about 12 days. If you were to count to 1 billion, it would take about 32 years. And if you were to count to 1 trillion, it would take about 31,710 years. And to count out the dollars of our current national debt of more than $16 trillion, it would take more than 507,357 years of counting one number each second without ever stopping. The point is — a trillion is a HUGE, GARGANTUAN number and 16 trillion is completely off the charts. We must have a serious national debate about cutting government spending. And then we must dramatically cut spending before we become the next Greece. We cannot delay.


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